Established 1987 in Barbourville, Kentucky

Knox Historical Museum

History & Genealogy Center

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Your membership helps to support the museum and you will also receive a four-issue subscription to our award-winning newsletter The Knox Countian.

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The Knox Countian

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Knox Historical Museum

  • 13 large photos suitable for framing
  • 1 in a collectible souvenir series
  • glossy sharp photographs
  • photos selected by Mike Mills

only $10.00

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Fall and Winter Issues of Knox Countian magazine now available at museum

The fall and winter issues of the Knox Historical Museum's quarterly magazine, The Knox Countian, are now available for purchase at the Museum itself in Barbourville or via the online museum store. The cost per magazine at the museum is $3 while the cost via the website is $3 plus 6 percent sales tax and a $1.25 shipping fee.

The following lists the major content of the two issues.

knox volume 025 number 003 cover image.jpg

Vol. 25 No. 3

  • Early Railroad History in 19th Century Knox County, including The Tunnel: Railroad Construction at Brafford's Ridge and Emanuel Around the Turn of the 19th Century. Included are photos of the Emanuel Hollow Tunnel today; the construction of the L&N tunnel at Emanuel in 1921; a diagram of the old tunnel at Brafford's Ridge; concrete poured tunnel being topped with rock and fill earth in 1922; and a Marion shovel loading western narrow-gauge dump cars in 1921.
  • The Barbourville Story, parts 9 & 10, written by W.S. Hudson about the town's contribution of distinguished men to the nation's service, with additional articles from Frederick A. Wallis, Douglas Bargo and Charles Reed Mitchell. Photos are of Judge Ida Mae Adams, U.S. Senator William Abner Stanfill, Governor Flem D. Sampson, Walter G. Campbell, head of the Federal Food and Drug Administration in Washington, D.C., Dr. Allan D. Tuggle and Rear Admiral Richard B. Tuggle.
  • Nasby Mills on Stinking Creek in Knox County, Kentucky, Part 5: Nasby Mills Leaves Bell Fork, 1839-1840 by Michael C. Mills. Photos are of Isaac Mills II and wife Mary, Obie Mills, John M. Bingham, and early 20th century deed map of Stinking Creek.
  • Article and photo of the late Dr. Harold L. Bushey with his caplock rifle given to him by a patient
  • Article about Barbourville poet Sue Ann Wolfe Scalf (1935-2018), including photo
    knox volume 025 number 004 cover image.jpg

Vol. 25 No. 4

  • The Mintons and the Minton Hickory Mill and Horse Stables prepared by Douglas Bargo and featured in the Barbourville Story, Parts 11 and 12, written by W.S. Hudson. Photos are of famous golfer Bobby Jones shown with Vendetta, World's Grand Champion Saddlebred Horse at the Minton Horse Show in 1926;T.W. Minton and his lumbermen and wood workers at the first location of the Minton Hickory Mill; and various other photos of the T.W. Minton & Co. hickory mill; A tribute to Nola E. Minton over the years by Jane Minton Blair with three photos of Ms. Minton over the years.
  • Nasby Mills on Stinking Creek, Part 6: Nasby Mills at Brices Creek, 1840-1865 by Michael C. Mills. Photos are of Evie Mills and David Mills at the grave of Nasby Mills.
  • The Great Flood of 1946 by John S. "Jack" Gibson, with photos of the Robert E. Viall house on the corner of College and High streets at the height of the 1946 flood and the unique Wimmer house on College Street.
  • The Museum Bookshelf features reviews by Susan Liford and Ina Gatliff of Deborah Gray's Lessons My Maw Taught Me and Other Memorable Stories; and a note by Charles Reed Mitchell about Don Dampier's new book about basketball beginnings in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
  • Article and photo about new signs drawing attention to Big and Little Richland Creeks


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